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      National fitness dayDitch the car for local trips and walk to the shops. If it’s safe and you are able to, try and pick up the pace to get your heart rate up, returning to a slower pace before accelerating once again. It needn’t be a lot at the start, maybe just around the block. 

      Visit the beach and stroll along the sand listening to the waves or visit a stately home and its grounds, for not only a great day out but it gets you off the chair and out and about.

      ‘Get on yer bike’ is an expression that has a lot of merit. Get those legs moving, your lungs going and hit the road, the fields or for the adventurous, the mountains with your bike.

      Volunteer for a local charity, either to work in a charity shop or undertake some renovations for a good cause, you’ll be amazed how many daily steps you’ll take by just getting involved.

      Clear out the ‘stuff’ you just don’t need and when you get stuck-in, not only will it give you a great sense of satisfaction and more personal space, it also gets you active.

      Get ‘arty’ and visit galleries or museums. Make a day of it and fit in say, two and by finally getting round to going to a visitor attraction that’s always appealed, it will also lift your spirits and add to your steps.

      It needn’t be about the gym or joining a golf club, the smallest things will make a difference your health and wellbeing. Just try and do one small thing per day and you’ll soon feel the benefits.

      timeIn this frenetic world where we all live, there is little time so perhaps it’s interesting to look at the word ‘time’ and see how it’s used in so many different expressions to say something indirect but something we all understand.

      We are used to children’s stories starting with ‘once upon a time’ which is a pretty vague way of mentioning a moment in time but not being definitive. If we look at the expression ‘wouldn’t give you/ or them the time of day,’ this is negatively expressing someone won’t help in any way whatsoever, no matter what. 

      ‘Just in time’ and ‘just on time’ is interesting as if we say ‘I got to the theatre just in time’ but we’d say ‘the bus was on time’ but swap ‘in’ and ‘on’ into the other sentence, yes they both make sense but it’s not common terminology. 

      ‘Time after time’ can be a way of expressing irritation – ‘I told him time after time…’and is the equivalent of ‘over and over again’ but it can be softer in terms of relating to something which is constant or without fail, depending on the context. 

      If you’re ‘doing time’ clearly a person’s incarcerated as a prisoner and completing a sentence but by using ‘time and again’ this refers to do something habitually. 

      If we say ‘About time’, we’re sarcastically saying someone or something is long overdue. When we say ‘At all times’ this means you must always do or adhere to a command but the expression ‘from time to time’ means just now and then, whilst being ‘behind the times’ is to be old fashioned. 

      There are so many ‘time’ idioms embedded into our everyday colloquial language and of course it’s about the context. But because we are all driven by clocks and adhering to a set time such as getting to work on time, or collecting the kids, it’s no wonder it’s so ingrained into our lives.

      But try to ‘make time’ for the things you enjoy, especially as its International Stress Awareness Week. Endeavour ‘To pass the time of day’ and just meander along with no stresses or urgency.

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            Sue Wieteska, CEO of Advanced Life Support Group (ALSG) comments on the recent announcement by the government to change pensions to be more flexible. 

            “With a lot of consultants leaving or reducing their hours due to the Tapered Annual Allowance which can affect their pension contributions and sees some facing increased tax bills, it is excellent news that the government has listened to the British Medical Association (BMA) www.bma.org.uk/ who have been at the forefront of highlighting the issues.

            “The government is putting out a consultation paper which I welcome with open arms however, shouldn’t the whole health sector be reviewed and be included in this new flexible approach which is expected to be implemented? What about dentists? What about nurses and other medical professionals?

            “Easing rules is an excellent idea to keep people in the profession for as long as possible but surely it shouldn’t just be aimed at high earners only, and shouldn’t the government take a consistent approach?"

            Read the article here

            In Scotland Nicola Sturgeon announced last year at her party conference that student nurses would have a bursary of £8,100pa rising to £10,000 in 2020. Click here for the full article

            Sue Wieteska, CEO of Advanced Life Support Group, said:  

            “Scotland is taking an important step with this decision, as it is clear there’s a direct correlation between being supported with funding which is the case in Scotland for student nurses, and the rise in recruitment.   

            “Other Governments could learn this easy lesson if it recognises the need to increase nurses entering the profession, as well as the retention of staff, it must ensure a portion of funding is ring-fenced for training. 

            “At ALSG, an organisation which has been at the forefront of training doctors, nurses and other clinicians for now more than 25 years, I have anecdotal evidence that the profession simply doesn’t feel financially supported.   

            “This is by no means empirical evidence but it does gives a real insight into the monetary struggle nurses in particular find to revalidate.  Isn’t it time to literally ‘put your money where your mouth is’?”


            Sue Wieteska, CEO of Advanced Life Support Group (ALSG) commented on the news report from ITV News in research undertaken by NHS England and NHS Improvement. The findings has cited admissions to emergency hospitals are from residents in care homes. 

            Sue said: “The statistic of 41% suggests these admissions could be significantly reduced as some conditions don’t necessarily require hospital admission and care homes need support to achieve this.

            “Interestingly, ALSG and the Manchester Triage Group working with NWAS (North West Ambulance Services) has adapted its world recognised Manchester Triage Tool, to purposely fit and match requirements specific to care homes which is called Nursing and Triage Tool (NaRT).

            “Since NaRT’s implementation in more than 200 homes in the North West of England, we have seen significant reductions of transfers to EDs from care homes which is not only good news for hospitals relieving pressure on resources but great news for residents who prefer to remain in their own environment and familiar surroundings.” 

            Read the news report here

            Sue Wieteska, CEO for Advanced Life Support Group (ALSG) comments on the benefits of undertaking a research bursary.

            “Bursaries are imperative to the progression of a specific field and this is particularly vital to healthcare. Undertaking research delivers evidence and new strategies to clinical approaches whilst advancing specialty areas.

            Involving health care staff is also necessary in any research as this improves standards as well as engaging clinicians who have day-to-day experience and knowledge within the health sector and it would be imprudent to overlook their contribution.

            Launched in 2017, the ‘Mike Davis Bursary Fund’, marked the retirement of Mike as ALSG’s lead educator after a hugely successful 21 years in post.  In honour of Mike’s contribution to ALSG, we offer this special fund annually to give future ALSG instructors the opportunity to complete a GIC where they may not have the financial support to do so. For more information and to apply, click here."